Difference between revisions of "Arch User Repository"

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|question=How many votes does it take to get a PKGBUILD into [community]?
 
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|answer=Usually, at least 10 votes are required for something to move into [community]. However, if a TU wants to support an package, it will often be found in the repository.}}
  
 
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Revision as of 08:41, 20 December 2009

Summary help replacing me
Provides an overview of the Arch User Repository.
Available in languages

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Related articles
AUR User Guidelines
AUR Trusted User Guidelines
AUR Helpers
External links
AUR Web Interface
AUR Mailing List

The Arch User Repository (AUR for short) is a community-driven repository of PKGBUILDs for Arch users. Packages in the AUR are built using PKGBUILDs and are not pre-built binaries like from the official repositories. The AUR was created to organize and share new packages from the community and to help expedite popular packages' inclusion into the [community] repository.

A good number of new packages that enter the official repositories start in the AUR. In the AUR, users are able to contribute their own package builds (PKGBUILD and related files). The AUR community has the ability to vote for or against packages in the AUR. If a package becomes popular enough -- provided it has a compatible license and good packaging technique -- it may to be entered in the [community] repository (directly accessible by pacman or ABS).

Besides this article, please make sure to read the AUR User Guidelines if you want to be an AUR User, and the AUR Trusted User Guidelines if you plan to be a Trusted User.

Getting started

Users can search and download PKGBUILDs from the AUR Web Interface. These PKGBUILDs can be built into installable packages using makepkg, then installed using pacman.

History

The following items are listed for historical purposes only. They have since been superseded by the AUR and are no longer available.

At the beginning, there was:

ftp://ftp.archlinux.org/incoming 

...and people contributed by simply uploading the PKGBUILD, the needed supplementary files, and the built package itself to the server. The package remained there until a Package Maintainer saw it and adopted it.

Then the Trusted User Repositories were born. Certain individuals in the community were allowed to host their own repositories for anyone to use. The AUR expanded on this basis, with the aim of making it both more flexible and more usable. In fact, the AUR maintainers are still referred to as TUs (Trusted Users).

FAQ

Common questions

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Common problems

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