Difference between revisions of "Bluetooth mouse"

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Revision as of 23:44, 8 April 2011

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This article describes how to set up a bluetooth mouse with Arch Linux. I used a Logitech v270 with a Trendnet TBW-101UB USB Bluetooth dongle, but the general process should be the same for any model.

Required software

You need the bluez-utils and bluez-libs packages from the extra repository. Looks like you also need dbus for automating things, otherwise hcid reports errors such as: "hcid[14851]: Unable to get on D-Bus". Enabling D-Bus also solved problems for local bluetooth device recognition.

Configuration

The pertinent options in /etc/conf.d/bluetooth are

HIDD_ENABLE=true

after that, start bluetooth services with

/etc/rc.d/bluetooth start

Finding out your mouse's bdaddr

It is of the form 12:34:56:78:9A:BC. Either find it in the documentation of your mouse, on the mouse itself or with the hcitool scan command.

kernel modules

The command

# modprobe -v hci_usb bluetooth hidp l2cap

loads the kernel modules you need, if they weren't loaded automatically.

(See below for some tips if you're stuck at this point)

Connecting the mouse

hidd --search
hcitool inq

are good for device scanning.

hidd --connect <bdaddr>

to actually connect.

hidd --show

will show your currently connected devices. The mouse should show up in this list. If it doesn't, press the reset button to make it discoverable.

Note: If you have the ipw3945 module loaded (wifi on HP computer) the bluetooth wont work.

Connecting the mouse at startup

Edit /etc/conf.d/bluetooth:

# Arguments to hidd
HIDD_OPTIONS="--connect <enter here your bluetooth mouse address>"

and test the new settings:

/etc/rc.d/bluetooth stop
hidd --killall (drop mouse connection)
/etc/rc.d/bluetooth start

Note: The above instructions to start the mouse at startup don't work with the now outdated 3.11 bluetooth packages. New versions such as the current (3.32) packages are not affected. If you are using an older version, then to start the mouse at startup, add:

hidd --connect <enter here your bluetooth mouse address (No capitals!!!)>

to your /etc/rc.local file.

Note #2: You can connect any bluetooth mouse and/or keyboard without any further configuration and without knowing the device address. You can do it by adding the --master and/or --server option in HIDD_OPTIONS depending on your device.

Troubleshooting tips

If you have trouble with your USB dongle, you may also want to try

# modprobe -v rfcomm

At this point, you should get an hci0 device with

# hcitool dev

Sometimes the device is not active right away - try starting the interface with

# hciconfig hci0 up

and searching for devices as shown above.