Difference between revisions of "Direct modem connection"

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(Article clean up: Cleaned up article in general.)
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[[Category:Networking]]
 
[[Category:Networking]]
 
{{i18n|Internet Access}}
 
{{i18n|Internet Access}}
 
+
{{Article summary start}}
{{Poor writing}}
+
{{Article summary text|This article describes how one can connect directly to the Internet from an Arch Linux box using an internal modem or external modem in bridge mode. }}
 
+
{{Article summary heading|Related}}
''This article describes how one can connect directly to the Internet from an Arch Linux box using an internal modem or external modem in bridge mode. Most users of external modems or those behind routers should consult the [[Configuring Network]] article instead.''
+
{{Article summary text|Most users of external modems or those behind routers should consult the [[Configuring Network]] article instead.}}
 +
{{Article summary end}}
  
 
Due to a lack of developers for dialup issues, connecting Arch to the
 
Due to a lack of developers for dialup issues, connecting Arch to the
Internet with a dialup line is requiring a lot of manual setup. If at
+
Internet with a dialup line requires a lot of manual setup. If at
all possible, set up a dedicated router which you can then use as a
+
all possible, set up a dedicated router which can be used as a
 
default gateway on the Arch box.
 
default gateway on the Arch box.
 
There are quite a few dialup related documents in the Arch Linux Wiki
 
  
 
==Analog Modem==
 
==Analog Modem==
  
To be able to use a Hayes-compatible, external, analog modem, you need to at least have the ppp package installed. Modify the file /etc/ppp/options to suit your needs and according to man pppd. You will need to define a chat script to supply your username and password to the ISP after the initial connection has been established. The manpages for pppd and chat have examples in them that should suffice to get a connection up and running if you're either experienced or stubborn enough. With udev, your serial ports usually are /dev/tts/0 and /dev/tts/1.
+
To be able to use a Hayes-compatible, external, analog modem, you need to at least have the {{Pkg|ppp}} package installed. Modify the file {{ic|/etc/ppp/options}} to suit your needs, following instructions located in {{ic|man pppd}}. You will need to define a chat script to supply your username and password to the ISP after the initial connection has been established. The manpages for pppd and chat have examples in them that should suffice to get a connection up and running if you're up for it. With udev, your serial ports usually are {{ic|/dev/tts/0}} and {{ic|/dev/tts/1}}.
Tip: Read [[Dialup without a dialer HOWTO]].
+
{{Tip| Read [[Dialup without a dialer HOWTO]].}}
  
Instead of fighting a glorious battle with the plain pppd, you may opt to install wvdial or a similar tool to ease the setup process considerably. In case you're using a so-called WinModem, which is basically a PCI plugin card working as an internal analog modem, you should indulge in the vast information found on the [http://www.linmodems.org/ LinModem] homepage.
+
Instead of fighting a glorious battle with the plain pppd, you may opt to install {{pkg|wvdial}} or a similar tool to ease the setup process considerably. In case you're using a so-called WinModem, which is basically a PCI plugin card working as an internal analog modem, you should indulge in the vast information found on the [http://www.linmodems.org/ LinModem] homepage.
  
 
==ISDN==
 
==ISDN==
 +
{{Wikipedia|Isdn}}
  
 
Setting up ISDN is done in three steps:
 
Setting up ISDN is done in three steps:
Line 27: Line 27:
 
# Add settings for your ISP
 
# Add settings for your ISP
  
The current Arch stock kernels include the necessary ISDN modules, meaning that you will not need to recompile your kernel unless you're about to use rather odd ISDN hardware. After physically installing your ISDN card in your machine or plugging in your USB ISDN-Box, you can try loading the modules with modprobe. Nearly all passive ISDN PCI cards are handled by the hisax module, which needs two parameters: type and protocol. You must set protocol to '1' if your country uses the 1TR6 standard, '2' if it uses EuroISDN (EDSS1), '3' if you're hooked to a so-called leased-line without D-channel, and '4' for US NI1.
+
===Install and Configure Hardware===
 +
 
 +
The current Arch stock kernels include the necessary ISDN modules, meaning that you will not need to recompile your kernel unless you're about to use odd ISDN hardware. After physically installing your ISDN card in your machine or plugging in your USB ISDN-Box, you can try loading the modules with modprobe. Nearly all passive ISDN PCI cards are handled by the hisax module, which needs two parameters: type and protocol. You must set protocol to:
 +
* '1' if your country uses the 1TR6 standard,
 +
* '2' if it uses EuroISDN (EDSS1),
 +
* '3' if you're hooked to a so-called leased-line without D-channel, and
 +
* '4' for US NI1.
  
 
Details on all those settings and how to set them is included in the kernel documentation, more specifically in the isdn subdirectory, and available online. The type parameter depends on your card; a list of all possible types can be found in the README.HiSax kernel documentation. Choose your card and load the module with the appropriate options like this:
 
Details on all those settings and how to set them is included in the kernel documentation, more specifically in the isdn subdirectory, and available online. The type parameter depends on your card; a list of all possible types can be found in the README.HiSax kernel documentation. Choose your card and load the module with the appropriate options like this:
Line 33: Line 39:
 
  # modprobe hisax type=18 protocol=2
 
  # modprobe hisax type=18 protocol=2
  
This will load the hisax module for my ELSA Quickstep 1000PCI, being used in Germany with the EDSS1 protocol. You should find helpful debugging output in your /var/log/everything.log file, in which you should see your card being prepared for action. Please note that you will probably need to load some USB modules before you can work with an external USB ISDN Adapter.
+
This will load the hisax module for my ELSA Quickstep 1000PCI, being used in Germany with the EDSS1 protocol. You should find helpful debugging output in your {{ic|/var/log/everything.log}} file, in which you should see your card being prepared for action. Please note that you will probably need to load some USB modules before you can work with an external USB ISDN Adapter.
  
Once you have confirmed that your card works with certain settings, you can add the module options to your /etc/modprobe.d/modprobe.conf:
+
Once you have confirmed that your card works with certain settings, you can add the module options to your [[modprobe]] configuration:
 +
{{Hc|head=/etc/modprobe.d/modprobe.conf|output=<nowiki>
 +
alias ippp0 hisax
 +
options hisax type=18 protocol=2</nowiki>}}
  
alias ippp0 hisax
+
Alternatively, you can add only the options line here, and add hisax to your MODULES array in the [[rc.conf]]. It's your choice, really, but this example has the advantage that the module will not be loaded until it's really needed.
options hisax type=18 protocol=2
+
 
+
Alternatively, you can add only the options line here, and add hisax to your MODULES array in the rc.conf. It's your choice, really, but this example has the advantage that the module will not be loaded until it's really needed.
+
  
 
That being done, you should have working, supported hardware. Now you need the basic utilities to actually use it!
 
That being done, you should have working, supported hardware. Now you need the basic utilities to actually use it!
  
Install the isdn4k-utils package, and read the manpage to isdnctrl; it'll get you started. Further down in the manpage you will find explanations on how to create a configuration file that can be parsed by isdnctrl, as well as some helpful setup examples. Please note that you have to add your SPID to your MSN setting separated by a colon if you use US NI1.
+
===Install and configure the ISDN utilities===
 +
 
 +
Install the {{pkg|isdn4k-utils}} package, and read the manpage to {{ic|isdnctrl}}, it'll get you started. Further down in the manpage you will find explanations on how to create a configuration file that can be parsed by {{ic|isdnctrl}}, as well as some helpful setup examples. Please note that you have to add your SPID to your MSN setting separated by a colon if you use US NI1.
  
After you have configured your ISDN card with the isdnctrl utility, you should be able to dial into the machine you specified with the PHONE_OUT parameter, but fail the username and password authentication. To make this work add your username and password to /etc/ppp/pap-secrets or /etc/ppp/chap-secrets as if you were configuring a normal analogous PPP link, depending on which protocol your ISP uses for authentication. If in doubt, put your data into both files.
+
After you have configured your ISDN card with the {{ic|isdnctrl}} utility, you should be able to dial into the machine you specified with the PHONE_OUT parameter, but fail the username and password authentication. To make this work add your username and password to {{ic|/etc/ppp/pap-secrets}} or {{ic|/etc/ppp/chap-secrets}} as if you were configuring a normal analogous PPP link, depending on which protocol your ISP uses for authentication. If in doubt, put your data into both files.
  
 
If you set up everything correctly, you should now be able to establish a dial-up connection with
 
If you set up everything correctly, you should now be able to establish a dial-up connection with
Line 56: Line 64:
 
These instructions are relevant to you only if your PC itself is supposed to manage the connection to your ISP. You do not need to do anything but define a correct default gateway if you are using a separate router of some sort to do the grunt work.
 
These instructions are relevant to you only if your PC itself is supposed to manage the connection to your ISP. You do not need to do anything but define a correct default gateway if you are using a separate router of some sort to do the grunt work.
  
Before you can use your DSL online connection, you will have to physically install the network card that is supposed to be connected to the DSL-Modem into your computer. After adding your newly installed network card to the modules.conf/modprobe.conf or the MODULES array, you should install the rp-pppoe package and run the pppoe-setup script to configure your connection. After you have entered all the data, you can connect and disconnect your line with
+
Before you can use your DSL online connection, you will have to physically install the network card that is supposed to be connected to the DSL-Modem into your computer. After adding your newly installed network card to the {{ic|modules.conf}}/{{ic|modprobe.conf}} or the [[rc.conf|MODULES]] array, you should install the {{Pkg|rp-pppoe}} package and run the {{ic|pppoe-setup}} script to configure your connection. After you have entered all the data, you can connect and disconnect your line with
  
 
  # /etc/rc.d/adsl start
 
  # /etc/rc.d/adsl start
Line 64: Line 72:
 
  # /etc/rc.d/adsl stop
 
  # /etc/rc.d/adsl stop
  
respectively. The setup usually is rather easy and straightforward, but feel free to read the manpages for hints. If you want to automatically 'dial in' at boot, add adsl to your DAEMONS array, and put a ! before the network entry, since the network is handled by adsl now.
+
respectively. The setup is usually easy and straightforward, but feel free to read the manpages for hints.  
 +
{{Tip|If you want to automatically 'dial in' at boot, add {{ic|adsl}} to your [[rc.conf|DAEMONS]] array, and prefix '''network''' with a bang (!) since the network is handled by adsl now.}}

Revision as of 10:16, 8 June 2012

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Template:Article summary start Template:Article summary text Template:Article summary heading Template:Article summary text Template:Article summary end

Due to a lack of developers for dialup issues, connecting Arch to the Internet with a dialup line requires a lot of manual setup. If at all possible, set up a dedicated router which can be used as a default gateway on the Arch box.

Analog Modem

To be able to use a Hayes-compatible, external, analog modem, you need to at least have the ppp package installed. Modify the file /etc/ppp/options to suit your needs, following instructions located in man pppd. You will need to define a chat script to supply your username and password to the ISP after the initial connection has been established. The manpages for pppd and chat have examples in them that should suffice to get a connection up and running if you're up for it. With udev, your serial ports usually are /dev/tts/0 and /dev/tts/1.

Instead of fighting a glorious battle with the plain pppd, you may opt to install wvdial or a similar tool to ease the setup process considerably. In case you're using a so-called WinModem, which is basically a PCI plugin card working as an internal analog modem, you should indulge in the vast information found on the LinModem homepage.

ISDN

Template:Wikipedia

Setting up ISDN is done in three steps:

  1. Install and configure hardware
  2. Install and configure the ISDN utilities
  3. Add settings for your ISP

Install and Configure Hardware

The current Arch stock kernels include the necessary ISDN modules, meaning that you will not need to recompile your kernel unless you're about to use odd ISDN hardware. After physically installing your ISDN card in your machine or plugging in your USB ISDN-Box, you can try loading the modules with modprobe. Nearly all passive ISDN PCI cards are handled by the hisax module, which needs two parameters: type and protocol. You must set protocol to:

  • '1' if your country uses the 1TR6 standard,
  • '2' if it uses EuroISDN (EDSS1),
  • '3' if you're hooked to a so-called leased-line without D-channel, and
  • '4' for US NI1.

Details on all those settings and how to set them is included in the kernel documentation, more specifically in the isdn subdirectory, and available online. The type parameter depends on your card; a list of all possible types can be found in the README.HiSax kernel documentation. Choose your card and load the module with the appropriate options like this:

# modprobe hisax type=18 protocol=2

This will load the hisax module for my ELSA Quickstep 1000PCI, being used in Germany with the EDSS1 protocol. You should find helpful debugging output in your /var/log/everything.log file, in which you should see your card being prepared for action. Please note that you will probably need to load some USB modules before you can work with an external USB ISDN Adapter.

Once you have confirmed that your card works with certain settings, you can add the module options to your modprobe configuration:

/etc/modprobe.d/modprobe.conf
alias ippp0 hisax
options hisax type=18 protocol=2

Alternatively, you can add only the options line here, and add hisax to your MODULES array in the rc.conf. It's your choice, really, but this example has the advantage that the module will not be loaded until it's really needed.

That being done, you should have working, supported hardware. Now you need the basic utilities to actually use it!

Install and configure the ISDN utilities

Install the isdn4k-utils package, and read the manpage to isdnctrl, it'll get you started. Further down in the manpage you will find explanations on how to create a configuration file that can be parsed by isdnctrl, as well as some helpful setup examples. Please note that you have to add your SPID to your MSN setting separated by a colon if you use US NI1.

After you have configured your ISDN card with the isdnctrl utility, you should be able to dial into the machine you specified with the PHONE_OUT parameter, but fail the username and password authentication. To make this work add your username and password to /etc/ppp/pap-secrets or /etc/ppp/chap-secrets as if you were configuring a normal analogous PPP link, depending on which protocol your ISP uses for authentication. If in doubt, put your data into both files.

If you set up everything correctly, you should now be able to establish a dial-up connection with

# isdnctrl dial ippp0

as root. If you have any problems, remember to check the logfiles!

DSL (PPPoE)

These instructions are relevant to you only if your PC itself is supposed to manage the connection to your ISP. You do not need to do anything but define a correct default gateway if you are using a separate router of some sort to do the grunt work.

Before you can use your DSL online connection, you will have to physically install the network card that is supposed to be connected to the DSL-Modem into your computer. After adding your newly installed network card to the modules.conf/modprobe.conf or the MODULES array, you should install the rp-pppoe package and run the pppoe-setup script to configure your connection. After you have entered all the data, you can connect and disconnect your line with

# /etc/rc.d/adsl start

and

# /etc/rc.d/adsl stop

respectively. The setup is usually easy and straightforward, but feel free to read the manpages for hints.

Tip: If you want to automatically 'dial in' at boot, add adsl to your DAEMONS array, and prefix network with a bang (!) since the network is handled by adsl now.