Difference between revisions of "HiDPI"

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(Desktop environments: Cinnamon)
(KDE HiDPI status section added.)
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To reset this set {{ic|scaling-factor}} to {{ic|1}}.
 
To reset this set {{ic|scaling-factor}} to {{ic|1}}.
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=== KDE ===
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KDE stll has it's share of HiDPI [https://community.kde.org/KDE/High-dpi_issues issues] but HiDPI support can be improved by changing the below settings:
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# Increase font dpi (System Settings → Application Appearance → Fonts → Force font dpi, enter a number such as 125, 144 or 150 etc)
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# Increase icon sizes (System Settings → Application Appearance → Icons → Advanced, here choose a higher icon size for all icons, eg. just increase each icon type by one step)
  
 
=== Xfce ===
 
=== Xfce ===

Revision as of 20:50, 5 July 2014

HiDPI (High Dots Per Inch), also known as Retina display, is simply a name for screens with a high resolution. The examples are Apple MacBooks labeled "with Retina", as well as some ultrabooks (e.g. Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro).

Not all software behaves well in high-resolution mode yet. Here are listed most common tweaks which make work on a HiDPI screen more pleasant.

Note: gtk3 3.10 and 3.12 require HiDPI support in cairo, but the current release (cairo 1.12.16-2) does not yet have this support. In order to enable full HiDPI support for Gtk3 programs, you will have to build cairo-gitAUR and then rebuild gtk3 off of these newer cairo libraries. A bug has been filed at FS#40932.

Desktop environments

GNOME 3

GNOME seems to be supporting HiDPI since 3.10. The support is not particularly great, though.

For now to correctly enable HiDPI in GNOME you need latest version of cairo-git, and rebuild gtk with this version of cairo (this includes v3.12).

To enable HiDPI, set your interface factor scaling using gsettings:

   gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface scaling-factor 2

To reset this set scaling-factor to 1.

KDE

KDE stll has it's share of HiDPI issues but HiDPI support can be improved by changing the below settings:

  1. Increase font dpi (System Settings → Application Appearance → Fonts → Force font dpi, enter a number such as 125, 144 or 150 etc)
  2. Increase icon sizes (System Settings → Application Appearance → Icons → Advanced, here choose a higher icon size for all icons, eg. just increase each icon type by one step)

Xfce

Go to Settings Editor (you can find it in Settings Manager), and change the DPI parameter in xsettingsXft. The value of 180 seems to work well on Retina screens.

To enlarge icons in system tray, right-click on it (aim for empty space / top pixels / bottom pixels, so that you will not activate icons themselves) → “Properties” → set “Maximum icon size” to 32, 48 or 64.

Cinnamon

Supports HiDPI since 2.2. Even without rebuilding GTK3, the support is pretty good (e.g. window borders are correctly sized, which isn't the case under Xfce).

Browsers

Firefox

Open Firefox advanced preferences page (about:config) and set parameter layout.css.devPixelsPerPx to 2 (or find the one that suits you better; 2 is a good choice for Retina screens).

Chromium / Google Chrome

No official support yet. Watch this thread: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=143619. In the meantime try setting default page zoom level to 200% (although it is not the most elegant solution).

For more adventurous users, Chromium can be recompiled using the -Denable_hidpi=1 flag to use experimental HiDPI scaling. Use the ABS to download the chromium package source, then edit the PKGBUILD file to add the flag. Note that this option will partially break context menus, but will optimize the interface and all webpages.

Mail clients

Thunderbird

See Firefox. To access about:config, go to Edit → Preferences → Advanced → Config editor.

Skype

Skype is a Qt program, and needs to be configured separately. You cannot change the DPI setting for it, but at least you can change font size. Install qt4 and run qtconfig-qt4 to do it.