Difference between revisions of "Installing VMware Player"

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(create fake directories so that installer doesn't complain about the system service runlevels directory not being an init directory)
m (moved Installing vmware player to Installing VMware Player: Named the page correctly.)
(No difference)

Revision as of 13:02, 29 October 2009


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Introduction

The quickest and easiest way I've found to install vmware player under Arch.

This WIKI was done for vmwareplayer 1.03 with Kernel 2.6.20. The package names will change for later versions, please substitute the new names at that point.

For this exercise download all files needed and place them in a directory called ~/pkgbuild. You don't need to download the vmware-player and kernel modules yourself, as the makepkg script will do that for itself.

Tip: If you have already downloaded one/both of these 'large files', just place them into their respective directories, which will be referred to below as ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/ and ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player/.

Setting up vmware-player-modules

You will need to visit the vmware-player-modules page on the AUR site and download vmware-player-modules.tar.gz.

Extract them into ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/ and build the package:

$ cd ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/
$ makepkg

This will download the files needed and make a file called something similar to:

~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/vmware-player-modules-1.0.3_34682-2.pkg.tar.gz

This file will now be installed with pacman:

# pacman -U ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/vmware-player-modules-1.0.3_34682-2.pkg.tar.gz

If all went well the vmware kernel modules will now be installed.

Setting up vmware-player

You will need to visit the vmware-player page on the AUR site and download vmware-player.tar.gz.

Extract them into ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player and build the package:

$ cd ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player/
$ makepkg

This will download the files needed and make a file called something similar to:

~/pkgbuild/vmware-player/vmware-player-1.0.3_34682-1.pkg.tar.gz

This file will now be installed with pacman:

# pacman -U ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player/vmware-player-1.0.3_34682-1.pkg.tar.gz

If all went well the vmware player will now be installed.

Configuration

You need to configure VMware Player by invoking /usr/bin/vmware-config.pl

Also, you should add vmware to the DAEMONS array in /etc/rc.conf

Troubleshooting

x86_64

In case you get this error when loading an .vmx file:

/usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx: error while loading shared libraries: libXtst.so.6: wrong ELF class: ELFCLASS64

Make sure that lib32-libxtst [found in community repo] is installed.

Future kernel updates

If there is a kernel update in the future and vmwareplayer will not load, you will have to recompile the modules package. You don't need to download the vmware-player-modules.tar.gz again, only if it has changes. You can search at http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php for vmware-player-modules. Then:

$ cd ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/
$ makepkg

And install the package with pacman:

# pacman -U ~/pkgbuild/vmware-player-modules/vmware-player-modules-1.0.3_34682-2.pkg.tar.gz

Thanking pizzapunk who kindly helped me with my vmware-player installation.

--habtool 11:13, 20 February 2007 (EST)

VMWare Player >= 2.5

Download the VMware-Player-xxx-xxx.<architecture>.bundle file from the VMWare Website and save it in any directory you like. Then, you need to create the same directories as you need installing VMWare Server. As root:

# mkdir -p /etc/rc.d/vmware.d/rc{0,1,2,3,4,5,6}.d

Then execute (as root) the installation binary:

# ./VMware-Player-xxx-xxx.<architecture>.bundle

When it promts for System Service Runlevels answer:

/etc/rc.d/vmware.d/

If you get told that "/etc/rc.d/vmware.d is not an init directory", create some dummy directories:

cd /etc/rc.d/vmware.d
mkdir rc0.d rc1.d rc2.d rc3.d rc4.d rc5.d rc6.d init.d

For System Service Scripts use:

/etc/rc.d

You do not need to manually reconfigure the kernel modules each time you perform a kernel update. VMPlayer will do this for you when you start it up.

Infact, vmware-config.pl is gone. If you need to manually reconfigure your kernel modules do (as root):

/usr/bin/vmware-modconfig --console --install-all