Difference between revisions of "Locale"

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... for example.
 
... for example.
  
Configuring a locale will allow some terminals (such as xterm) to display non-Latin characters properly. If you need bidirectional support, consider installing [[mlterm]].
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Configuring a locale will allow some terminals (such as xterm) to display non-Latin characters properly. If you need bidirectional support (required for Arabic and Hebrew, for instance), consider installing [[mlterm]].
  
 
[[Category:Internationalisation]]
 
[[Category:Internationalisation]]

Revision as of 01:55, 22 December 2006

Configuring (adding and removing) locales is a breeze. As super user, edit /etc/locale.gen, uncommenting (removing "#" from the beginning of appropriate lines) the locales you require. Then, run locale-gen. If you now run locale -a, you should see the locales you have specified.

For your locale to come into effect, you must set it in /etc/rc.conf. Pick the desired locale from your earlier locale -a output and edit the default setting of

LOCALE="en_US.utf8"


This is a system-wide setting, so if you have multiple users on your machine, they might prefer to set their own locale in a login script, for example .bashrc. Just add

export LANG="de_DE@euro"

... for example.

Configuring a locale will allow some terminals (such as xterm) to display non-Latin characters properly. If you need bidirectional support (required for Arabic and Hebrew, for instance), consider installing mlterm.