SSHFS

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Revision as of 02:57, 4 November 2009 by Ciphercast (talk | contribs) (thunar remote file access tip)
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Introduction

You can use sshfs to mount a remote system - accessible via ssh - to a local folder, so you will be able to do any operation on the mounted files with any tool (copy, rename, edit with vim, etc.). Using sshfs instead of shfs is generally preferred as a new version of shfs hasn't been released since 2004.

Installation

To install the needed packages, do:

# pacman -S sshfs

This should install fuse and sshfs, and maybe other packages.

Usage

First a kernel module should be loaded, so as root, do:

# modprobe fuse

(You can put fuse into the module-list of /etc/rc.conf to auto-load at boot.)

Mounting

You will use the command sshfs. To mount a remote directory:

# sshfs USERNAME@HOSTNAME_OR_IP:/PATH LOCAL_MOUNT_POINT SSH_OPTIONS

For example:

# sshfs sessy@mycomputer:/home/sessy /mnt/sessy -C -p 9876

Where 9876 is the port number.

Also, make certain that before connecting, you set the file permissions for any local client folders you will attempt to mount a remote directory to. I.e., don't have everything owned by root!

SSH will ask for the password, if needed. If you don't want to type in your password 49 times a day, than read this: How to Use RSA Key Authentication with SSH.

Unmounting

To unmount the remote system:

# fusermount -u LOCAL_MOUNT_POINT

Example:

# fusermount -u /mnt/sessy

Tips

To quickly mount a remote dir, do some file-management and unmount it, put this in a script:

sshfs USERNAME@HOSTNAME_OR_IP:/PATH LOCAL_MOUNT_POINT SSH_OPTIONS
mc ~ LOCAL_MOUNT_POINT
fusermount -u LOCAL_MOUNT_POINT

This will mount the remote directory, launch MC, and unmount it when you exit.

Thunar has issues with FAM and remote file access. If you experience remote folders not displaying, getting kicked back to the home directory, or other remote file access issues through Thunar, replace fam with gamin. Gamin is derived from fam.

pacman -S gamin


Troubleshooting

Connection reset by peer

  • If you are trying to access the remote system with a hostname, try using its IP address, as it can be a domain name solving issue. Make sure you edit /etc/hosts with the server details.
  • Adding the option 'sshfs_debug' (as in 'sshfs -o sshfs_debug user@server ...') can help in resolving the issue.
  • If you're trying to sshfs into a router running DD-WRT or the like, there is a solution here.
  • Forum thread: sshfs: Connection reset by peer

fstab

An example on how to use sshfs to mount a remote filesystem through /etc/fstab

sshfs#USERNAME@HOSTNAME_OR_IP:/REMOTE/DIRECTORY /LOCAL/MOUNTPOINT fuse defaults 0 0

Take for example a line from my fstab

sshfs#llib@192.168.1.200:/home/llib/FAH /media/FAH2 fuse defaults 0 0

Although the above will not work automatically unless you are using a ssh key for the user. Using SSH Keys.

If you want to use sshfs with multiple users :

sshfs#user@domain.org:/home/user  /media/user   fuse    defaults,allow_other    0  0


Note: With the above method, umount complains that the filesystem is not in fstab. To get around this, remove the 'sshfs#' prefix, change the filesystem from 'fuse' to 'fuse.sshfs', and create a script '/sbin/mount.fuse.sshfs':

#!/bin/bash
DEVICE="$1"
MOUNTPOINT="$2"
OPTIONS="$4"

OPTIONS="${OPTIONS/,noauto/}"
OPTIONS="${OPTIONS/,user/}"

# workaround to conflicting 'user' options
# in fstab, specify 'login=joe' instead of 'user=joe'
OPTIONS="${OPTIONS/,login=/,user=}"

exec /usr/bin/sshfs "$DEVICE" "$MOUNTPOINT" -o "$OPTIONS"

See also