Difference between revisions of "Talk:ASUS Eee PC 901"

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(What about the 1000/1000H?)
(Remove closed discussions.)
 
(25 intermediate revisions by 11 users not shown)
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What dependencies do people supposedly need to recompile the stock kernel for? (section Option 1: Compile and customize the stock kernel) I didn't recompile my kernel on my 901 and everything I can think of works fine. I think this section should be changed or clarified to explain why its recommended to recompile.
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== Bluetooth (de)activation on 2.6.32 ==
  
--[[User:Chori|Chori]] 13:29, 23 September 2008 (EDT)
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Hi all, I'm writing in talk because I just tried kernel 2.6.32 on the EEE 901 and I have something to report. I'm actually not using archlinux, I just found this wiki very helpful for my setup, so feel free to ignore this comment (and even delete it) if the situation here doesn't apply to you.
There are some patches applied to the kernel source:  in particular, to the acpi driver, to the mouse driver, to the rt2860sta driver, to improve them, fix bugs, and add functionality. It's true that you can run ArchLinux on the EEE 901 with just the stock kernel;  but it's not optimized for it, and many users have experienced problems.  Your point is well-taken, however, I'll clarify that section.
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== What about the 1000/1000H? ==
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In my case, bluetooth was toggled via an rfkill interface, pretty much like wireless, except that rfkill[bluetooth] = rfkill[wlan+1]:
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  echo 1|0 > /sys/devices/platform/eeepc/rfkill/rfkill1/state
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The problem that I found is that the numbers of the rfkill interfaces sometimes change, therefore I'm using the following script (to be run as root) for bt toggling:
  
In all the article only the 901 model is commented. In my opinion, as all the things also apply to the 1000/1000H models (I guess) it should be corrected, for example, writing 901/1000/1000H where 901 is.
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#!/bin/bash
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# enumerate rfkill devices
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for rfkillDir in /sys/devices/platform/eeepc/rfkill/rfkill*
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do
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# check for bluetooth device
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if grep -q 'bluetooth' "$rfkillDir/name"
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then
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echo "Found bluetooth in $rfkillDir"
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read state < "$rfkillDir/state"
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if [ "$state" = "0" ]
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then
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echo "State was OFF. Turning ON"
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echo 1 > "$rfkillDir/state"
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else
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        echo "State was ON. Turning OFF"
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                        echo 0 > "$rfkillDir/state"
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fi
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fi
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done
  
--[[User:Chori|Chori]] 16:08, 9 October 2008 (EDT)
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I'm sorry if this is OT and if it doesn't help you, I just thought that it might. --[[User:IngFrancesco|IngFrancesco]] 08:11, 29 April 2010 (EDT)
There are some subtle differences in the hardware between the 901 and 1000 models.  If someone wants to take on highlighting the 100(H) specific idiosyncrasies, I'd be happy to expand the scope of this wiki page.
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Latest revision as of 07:06, 2 May 2013

Bluetooth (de)activation on 2.6.32

Hi all, I'm writing in talk because I just tried kernel 2.6.32 on the EEE 901 and I have something to report. I'm actually not using archlinux, I just found this wiki very helpful for my setup, so feel free to ignore this comment (and even delete it) if the situation here doesn't apply to you.

In my case, bluetooth was toggled via an rfkill interface, pretty much like wireless, except that rfkill[bluetooth] = rfkill[wlan+1]:

 echo 1|0 > /sys/devices/platform/eeepc/rfkill/rfkill1/state

The problem that I found is that the numbers of the rfkill interfaces sometimes change, therefore I'm using the following script (to be run as root) for bt toggling:

#!/bin/bash

# enumerate rfkill devices
for rfkillDir in /sys/devices/platform/eeepc/rfkill/rfkill*
do
	# check for bluetooth device
	if grep -q 'bluetooth' "$rfkillDir/name"
	then
		echo "Found bluetooth in $rfkillDir"
		read state < "$rfkillDir/state"
		if [ "$state" = "0" ]
		then
			echo "State was OFF. Turning ON"
			echo 1 > "$rfkillDir/state"
		else
		        echo "State was ON. Turning OFF"
                        echo 0 > "$rfkillDir/state"
		fi
	fi
done

I'm sorry if this is OT and if it doesn't help you, I just thought that it might. --IngFrancesco 08:11, 29 April 2010 (EDT)