Difference between revisions of "Talk:NTFS-3G"

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(Unmask option)
(/etc/fstab and the type parameter: new section)
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unmask with 0022 is only for root, that means as user you can't create or delete something. The right option for user is 0002.
 
unmask with 0022 is only for root, that means as user you can't create or delete something. The right option for user is 0002.
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== /etc/fstab and the type parameter ==
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Using my home server and its ntfs partition I discovered an issue in the wiki, that you can confirm or not.
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If in /etc/fstab I identify the ntfs partition with the 'ntfs-3g' parameter, like in the wiki, the partition is inaccessible and unmounted. The fstab isn't completely processed.
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But if I identify that with the 'ntfs' parameter it works perfectly as expected.

Revision as of 13:40, 26 August 2012

Anyone else having problems accessing punkrockguy's repository?

Default behaviour of mount

The page used to claim that `mount` uses `ntfsmount` from the ntfsprogs package when ntfs-3g is not explicitly stated. This appears to be incorrect (probably outdated), as the ntfs-3g package includes a symlink, /sbin/mount.ntfs, which is used by `mount` on default and points to /bin/ntfs-3g. Correct me if i'm wrong.

Nope, not gonna correct you, TaylanUB. Just tested an you're right. By default (in Arch) it uses ntfs-3g now. So this is good news. I think the install cd might still but for regular installs, we're good. Thanks for the updated information. Fixing.
Edit: Oop or not fixing. Thanks for doing TaylanUB.
--Gen2ly 18:58, 9 April 2010 (EDT)

Unmask option

umask: umask is a built-in shell command which automatically sets file permissions on newly created files. For Arch the default umask for root and user is 0022. With 0022 new folders have the directory permissions of 755 and new files have permissions of 644. You can read more about umask permissions here.

unmask with 0022 is only for root, that means as user you can't create or delete something. The right option for user is 0002.

/etc/fstab and the type parameter

Using my home server and its ntfs partition I discovered an issue in the wiki, that you can confirm or not. If in /etc/fstab I identify the ntfs partition with the 'ntfs-3g' parameter, like in the wiki, the partition is inaccessible and unmounted. The fstab isn't completely processed. But if I identify that with the 'ntfs' parameter it works perfectly as expected.