Difference between revisions of "Talk:NTFS-3G"

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(/etc/fstab and the type parameter: new section)
(NTFS-3G#Allowing_user_to_mount: re)
 
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Anyone else having problems accessing punkrockguy's repository?
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== [[NTFS-3G#Allowing_user_to_mount]] ==
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I added instructions to add users to the {{ic|disk}} group when using {{AUR|ntfs-3g-fuse}}. This was necessary to get access to usb sticks, in general acces to block devices {{ic|/dev/sd[a-z][1-9}}, as those are in the disk groups.
  
== Default behaviour of mount ==
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Is this good practice, or is there another way to achieve this?
  
The page used to claim that `mount` uses `ntfsmount` from the ntfsprogs package when ntfs-3g is not explicitly stated. This appears to be incorrect (probably outdated), as the ntfs-3g package includes a symlink, /sbin/mount.ntfs, which is used by `mount` on default and points to /bin/ntfs-3g. Correct me if i'm wrong.
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I ask, because [[Users and groups#Pre-systemd groups]] lists {{ic|disk}} as a group that usually doesn't require users to be added to manually because {{ic|systemd}} takes care of it.
  
: Nope, not gonna correct you, TaylanUB.  Just tested an you're right.  By default (in Arch) it uses ntfs-3g now.  So this is good news.  I think the install cd might still but for regular installs, we're good.  Thanks for the updated information.  Fixing.
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{{unsigned|08:53, 28 May 2017‎|David the goliath}}
  
: ''Edit:'' Oop or not fixing.  Thanks for doing TaylanUB.
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:No, it's not a good practice (and never has been) to add normal users to the {{ic|disk}} group. If you do this, they have full access to anything stored on any of your disks, including files normally accessible only by root. If you want normal users to be able to mount removable devices, use [[udisks]] or some [[Udisks#Mount_helpers|helper]] - these are safe tools that run with root privileges, either as daemons or with suid. -- [[User:Lahwaacz|Lahwaacz]] ([[User talk:Lahwaacz|talk]]) 12:12, 28 May 2017 (UTC)
 
 
: --[[User:Gen2ly|Gen2ly]] 18:58, 9 April 2010 (EDT)
 
 
 
== Unmask option ==
 
umask: umask is a built-in shell command which automatically sets file permissions on newly created files. For Arch the default umask for root and user is 0022. With 0022 new folders have the directory permissions of 755 and new files have permissions of 644. You can read more about umask permissions here.
 
 
 
unmask with 0022 is only for root, that means as user you can't create or delete something. The right option for user is 0002.
 
 
 
== /etc/fstab and the type parameter ==
 
 
 
Using my home server and its ntfs partition I discovered an issue in the wiki, that you can confirm or not.
 
If in /etc/fstab I identify the ntfs partition with the 'ntfs-3g' parameter, like in the wiki, the partition is inaccessible and unmounted. The fstab isn't completely processed.
 
But if I identify that with the 'ntfs' parameter it works perfectly as expected.
 

Latest revision as of 12:12, 28 May 2017

NTFS-3G#Allowing_user_to_mount

I added instructions to add users to the disk group when using ntfs-3g-fuseAUR. This was necessary to get access to usb sticks, in general acces to block devices /dev/sd[a-z][1-9, as those are in the disk groups.

Is this good practice, or is there another way to achieve this?

I ask, because Users and groups#Pre-systemd groups lists disk as a group that usually doesn't require users to be added to manually because systemd takes care of it.

—This unsigned comment is by David the goliath (talk) 08:53, 28 May 2017‎. Please sign your posts with ~~~~!

No, it's not a good practice (and never has been) to add normal users to the disk group. If you do this, they have full access to anything stored on any of your disks, including files normally accessible only by root. If you want normal users to be able to mount removable devices, use udisks or some helper - these are safe tools that run with root privileges, either as daemons or with suid. -- Lahwaacz (talk) 12:12, 28 May 2017 (UTC)