Difference between revisions of "ThinkPad OSD"

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[[Category:Laptops]]
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[[Category:Lenovo]]
 
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= Getting ThinkPad OSD working on Arch Linux =
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== General Note ==
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New desktop environments ([[GNOME]], [[KDE]], and maybe even [[Xfce]]) support their own osd notifications for important events (volume up/down/mute and brightness up/down), which might be enough for most users. In order to use those notifications instead of the ones provided by TPB, map the keyboard-events of those keys to the proper keycodes.
 
New desktop environments ([[GNOME]], [[KDE]], and maybe even [[Xfce]]) support their own osd notifications for important events (volume up/down/mute and brightness up/down), which might be enough for most users. In order to use those notifications instead of the ones provided by TPB, map the keyboard-events of those keys to the proper keycodes.
  
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* (udev 181-2) create /etc/udev/rules.d/tpb.rules:
 
* (udev 181-2) create /etc/udev/rules.d/tpb.rules:
 
  KERNEL=="nvram", GROUP="audio", MODE="0640"
 
  KERNEL=="nvram", GROUP="audio", MODE="0640"
 
  
 
* (udev 119-1) Edit /etc/udev/rules.d/51-arch.rules (WARNING: It will be overwritten with new udev update!)
 
* (udev 119-1) Edit /etc/udev/rules.d/51-arch.rules (WARNING: It will be overwritten with new udev update!)

Revision as of 06:14, 20 February 2013

New desktop environments (GNOME, KDE, and maybe even Xfce) support their own osd notifications for important events (volume up/down/mute and brightness up/down), which might be enough for most users. In order to use those notifications instead of the ones provided by TPB, map the keyboard-events of those keys to the proper keycodes.

Loading nvram at boot and give permission to access /dev/nvram

  • Check with lsmod if the nvram module is loaded on boot
  • If not, add nvram to MODULES=(... nvram) in /etc/rc.conf
  • Check /dev/nvram permissions, your user must have read access to it.
  • (udev 181-2) create /etc/udev/rules.d/tpb.rules:
KERNEL=="nvram", GROUP="audio", MODE="0640"
  • (udev 119-1) Edit /etc/udev/rules.d/51-arch.rules (WARNING: It will be overwritten with new udev update!)
KERNEL=="nvram",   NAME="misc/%k", SYMLINK+="%k", GROUP="kmem", MODE="0660"
  • (older udev) /etc/udev/rules.d/tpb.rules:
KERNEL=="nvram", NAME="misc/%k", SYMLINK+="%k", MODE="0660", GROUP="users"
  • Note: this line seems to work better for some users:
KERNEL=="nvram", GROUP="kmem", MODE="0660"
Note: Check if there is already a line matching nvram in the /etc/udev/rules.d/ directory. In this case, you have to modify the existing entry, and do not create a tpb.rules.
Note: Write access to nvram is only needed to set volume with MIXER ON. see /etc/tpbrc.

Setting a more readable color and better placement

/etc/tpbrc:

OSDCOLOR    Green
OSDVERTICAL 0
OSDHORIZONTAL 0
OSDPOS      MIDDLE
OSDALIGN    CENTER

Starting with KDE

~/.kde/Autostart/tpb-startup.sh:

# Start Thinkpad OSD daemon
if [ -x /usr/bin/tpb ] &&  [ -w /dev/nvram ] && [ -r /dev/nvram ]; then
    /usr/bin/tpb -d
fi

Starting with Fluxbox

~/.fluxbox/startup

# Start Thinkpad OSD daemon
if [ -x /usr/bin/tpb ] &&  [ -w /dev/nvram ] && [ -r /dev/nvram ]; then
    /usr/bin/tpb -d
fi

Play a sound on volume change

You can play a sound when using the volume buttons (mac like).

  • /etc/tpbrc
CALLBACK /usr/local/bin/callback_volume.sh
  • /usr/local/bin/callback_volume.sh
#!/bin/sh
[ "$1" = "volume" ] && exec canberra-gtk-play --file=/usr/share/sounds/freedesktop/stereo/audio-volume-change.oga
# chmod +x /usr/local/bin/callback_volume.sh
  • Then restart tpb.

See also