Localization

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Localization (often abbreviated as l10n) and internationalization (often abbreviated as i18n) "are means of adapting computer software to different languages, regional peculiarities and technical requirements of a target locale." Wikipedia:Internationalization and localization

This page is meant to act as a central hub, offering links to the various pages that deal with specific aspects of configuring an Arch Linux system to work with non-Latin languages. It also provides quick setup guides for some common non-Latin languages.

Fonts

See Fonts#Non-latin scripts for a non-exhaustive list of available non-Latin fonts.

Locale

See Locale for help with adding non-Latin language support to your system.

Input method

See Input method for help with non-Latin text input.

Keyboard layouts

See Keyboard configuration in console and Keyboard configuration in Xorg.

Quick setup

Note: This section provides examples which can help you quickly configure a system for a specific language, but they should not be treated as substitutes for the main content articles. Much better options may exist for your particular use case.

Chinese

See also /Chinese and /Simplified Chinese for additional information.

Fonts

Good choices for Chinese fonts include adobe-source-han-sans-cn-fonts and its adobe-source-han-serif-cn-fonts counterpart for simplified Chinese; adobe-source-han-sans-hk-fonts for traditional Chinese (Hong Kong); and adobe-source-han-sans-tw-fonts and its adobe-source-han-serif-tw-fonts counterpart for traditional Chinese (Taiwan).

Locale

Enable zh_CN.UTF-8 for simplified Chinese; zh_HK.UTF-8 for traditional Chinese (Hong Kong); zh_TW.UTF-8 for traditional Chinese (Taiwan); or zh_SG.UTF-8 for simplified Chinese (Singapore) in /etc/locale.gen and regenerate your system's locales by running /usr/bin/locale-gen.

Input method

A good and versatile choice for typing in Chinese is the Rime IME, which supports both Fcitx and IBus and provides a wealth of input system options (single and double Pinyin, Bopomofo, Cangjie, Wubixing, phonetic input, shape input, and more; both for simplified and traditional Chinese, as applicable).

Two other very popular and very well supported choices (especially in mainland China) include fcitx-sogoupinyinAUR and fcitx-baidupinyinAUR.

Install the package of your choice, then reboot your session.

Japanese

See also /Japanese for additional information.

Fonts

Good choices for Japanese fonts include adobe-source-han-sans-jp-fonts and its adobe-source-han-serif-jp-fonts counterpart.

Locale

Enable ja_JP.UTF-8 in /etc/locale.gen and regenerate your system's locales by running /usr/bin/locale-gen.

Input method

The currently most popular and well supported choice for typing in Japanese is Mozc. Depending on your system, install either ibus-mozc-utAUR (for GNOME and GTK based systems) or fcitx-mozc-utAUR (for KDE and Qt based systems), then reboot your session.

Korean

See also /Korean for additional information.

Fonts

Good choices for Korean fonts include adobe-source-han-sans-kr-fonts and its adobe-source-han-serif-kr-fonts counterpart.

Locale

Enable ko_KR.UTF-8 in /etc/locale.gen and regenerate your system's locales by running /usr/bin/locale-gen.

Input method

The currently most popular and well supported choice for typing in Korean is Libhangul. Depending on your system, install either ibus-hangul (for GNOME and GTK based systems) or fcitx-hangul (for KDE and Qt based systems), then reboot your session.

Indic

See also /Indic for additional information.

Fonts

Tango-inaccurate.pngThe factual accuracy of this article or section is disputed.Tango-inaccurate.png

Reason: Due to the multitude of scripts that exist for the Indic language family, input from a more knowledgeable contributor is needed in order to identify which font packages are needed to cover all the standard indic scripts. (Discuss in Talk:Localization#)

Good choices for Indic fonts include ttf-freebanglafontAUR and ttf-indic-otf, and also ttf-lklugAUR for the Sinhala script.

Locale

Enable in_HN.UTF-8 in /etc/locale.gen and regenerate your system's locales by running /usr/bin/locale-gen.

Input method

The currently most popular and well supported choice for typing in Indic is m17n. Depending on your system, install either ibus-m17n (for GNOME and GTK based systems) or fcitx-m17n (for KDE and Qt based systems), then reboot your session.

See also